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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
and this brings back sweet memories of when china was very isolated during the cold war. in the end, there's a whole new generation of people who have been much more sophisticated understanding, but that i would say it's a very strong autonomic response to the united states beefing up its forces in australia and then they wake up one morning and burma has flipped on them. it was eternal in terms of their faithful allies. these things caused a lot of consternation. so the old fear of diagnostically speaking in china is to fear with sand and travel without. these things happening around them excite them. >> how much does it add to that anxiety is that all? >> is the most problematic relationship now in japan and this is not good. i have to say i think japan probably hasn't played this as well as it might have, but i think on the other hand it would be fair to say also that it serves china's purposes to have something happening outside his orders which can rally people at home. there's a lot of complex things going on in each of these reactions to foreign movements outside. >> which ma
counterterrorism, and then the u.s. ambassador to china, gary locke, on the relationship between the two countries. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every other family up here. probably never happen again in history. and it's interesting because after dad was sworn in, we went and took a picture, photo of the family, behind the oval office desk, and that night we didn't get to move into the white house because nixon had left so quickly, so unexpectedly, they left their daughter and son-in-law, david eisenhower, to pack all their clothes and belongings. it literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexandria, virginia, suburbia, the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we had been living there dad was vice president. and i'll never forget. that night mom is cooking dinner. literally, we're sitting around the dinner table, and mom is cooking dinner, and she looked over at my dad and goes, gerry, something is wrong here. you just became president of the united states and i'm still cooking. >> steve ford, linda johnson robb, and j
? >> reporter: a new intelligence report reports that china will overtake the u.s. economy in 20 years, but america's more immediate concern was the unemployment rate, which finally slipped below 8% in six years. that helped ignite a record shopping spree. americans spent a record $59 billion over thanksgiving weekend but shopping slowed closer to christmas as consumers kept an eye on washington's efforts to avoid the fiscal cliff. alexis christoforous, "cbs news," new york. >>> coming up on "cbs this morning," an update on your last-minute holiday travel and we'll get a live report from dallas-ft. worth airport. >>> plus, the nra is speaking out in the debate over the gun control. we'll hear from someone from nra >>> and from ""zero dark thirty"" to "lincoln, we'll look back at the best films of 2012. that's your "cbs morning news" on this monday. thanks for watching. i'm duarte geraldino, have a great day. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com december 24. i'm frank mallicoat. >>> you're watching cbs 5 eyewitness news this morning. >>> hi, everyone, and good morning. >>> here's a che
invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens, of course another world war ii veteran, had flown the first cargo plane into what was then the king in 1944 and of course senator inouye was well regarded in china for that service. so the group of senators, there must have been a dozen of us from both parties, got more time with mr. hu and mr. wu the one and two leaders of china than almost the present of the united states would have. we recorded almost every -- because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another brothers. they acted that way in private and they served that way in the senate as chairman and vice chairman and chairman and vice chairman of the defense appropriations subcommittee. day, over a number of decades, single-handedly changed our american defense posture and they did it with skill and patriotism and knowledge of our structure that very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan dan inouye was. he was of the old-school. not a bad school for
an originator of new kinds of policies. if you take, for example, china policy i think that he may be reluctant to react to a china which is very different from the way it was in the past. >> brown: let me bring david ignatius back. i guess it depends on what you think is needed right now, right? >> i think the world's a mess as kerry believes. he's right. and needs a strong american voice. needs the sort of steady hand that some of these experiences can bring. i point i would make about kerry is that although he often comes across as a stiff, as an establishment figure very form layic, in terms of shall ideas an willness-- willingness to engage adversaries, reach out and try to find a channel to iran, for example, reach out to the palestinians, try to think of new ways to deal with the arab world, kerry is on the more innovative side. so i think he is not going to be a wild radical-- the country will miss having someone like susan rice who is a younger, different voice. but i think that kerry-- it's wrong to think of kerry of just being a throwback to 30 years ago. >> brown: is it clear still
invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courtesy we could possibly be accorded because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another "brothers." they acted that way in private. they served that way in the senate as chairman and vice-chairman and vice-chairman and chairman of the appropriations committee. they single-handedly shaped our american defense posture and they did it with skill and pay troivmen--and patriotism and the that very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan dan inouye was. he was of the old school. not a bad school for today, in my point of view. he treated each senator with
and wait it out. entry fee: a thousand dollars. in china, hundreds of people from the almighty god cult have been arrested for distributing leaflets. their crime? not warning of the end of the world but promoting war on the big red dragon-- the communist party. in the south of france it's believed by new ages to be the only safe place in the world. something to do with the shape of the mountain which overlooks the village. but today t.v. crews and police outnumbered prophets of doom. >> sreenivasan: in this country, nasa has produced a video to reassure those who need it. it's titled "why the world didn't end yesterday." the president of russia vladimir putin put new distance today between his government and the regime in syria. in his annual news conference, putin insisted his country is not protecting syrian president bashar assad. he urged assad to hold talks with the opposition, and negotiate an end to the bloodshed. >> ( translated ): we are not concerned about the fate of assad's regime. we understand what is going on there and that his family has been in power for 40 years. the c
even have to consider borrowing money from china or anywhere else and we're worried about a a.a.a. credit rating. why should we even have that as an option? we're the richest country in the world, and we put food out everywhere. also, one brief note on the gun laws issue. they're not going to ban a particular type of car because it drove through a crowd. so i don't see how they can target any particular weapon and say it's worse than another. combat loading weapon, you can almost do that as fast as you can pull the trigger also. so it's not a matter of how many rounds you can shoot. it's a matter of an insane person getting a hold of anything -- a knife, a car, anything. so -- guest: keith, and the reality of using guns for whatever illegal purposes oftentimes gets lost into washington, d.c. and the politics. boy, we're going to have to do something. we are going to have a press release, a press conference. there is a second amendment. thankfully the supreme court has recognized it is an individual right and a narrow decision. the one thing i want to go back, small business th
to pay toward china and the middle east will not let him. there was a successful sabotaging program against iran's nuclear program and a ery new approach of iran's central bank and other institutions that continues to enrich uranium. is kind of're seeing the twilight of america's cold war imperium in the middle east. the u.s. will have a relationship with the new egypt but it will not be the relationship of a client state that we saw with's the minority -- hosni mubarak or on war said sadat. is the changing relationship in the country like pakistan after the osama bin laden raid and in states like yemen. they look over the horizon that bahrain and say, we do not want that. host: one of the papers this morning has a story taking a look at the change in leadership in specific countries in asia and highlighting what is going on in north korea, south korea, and japan. what does that prove for the administration? guest: you can put north korea in the same category as japan and south korea. they have taken power and have produced leaders but are still checked by the open society and by th
as in china we went and helped people in small businesses that have been wiped out temporarily to be able to come back, our fishing people deserve emergency assistance to tide them over and help them through this most critical time. i would turn to the senator from alaska and the senator from new hampshire, and ask what that means to the state of new hampshire if she might share with us. mrs. shaheen: my friend from massachusetts understands the challenges we have in new hampshire, as does senator whitehouse from rhode island, because, in fact, fishing is one of the oldest industries that we have in new england. and new hampshire it dates back over 400 years. because we have a much smaller coastline than massachusetts and rhode island, we have a smaller -- smaller group of people who earn their living through fishing, but they have smaller boats, and therefore they're more affected by some of the fishing regulations and some of the adverse weather conditions that have affected fishing. about 90% of the fishing that new hampshire's fishermen do is for cod and cod is the species that has be
and the philippines, and expanding our mil-to-mil dialogue and exchanges with china. we are also enhancing our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes reality the naval fleet -- reallocating the naval fleet to achieve a 60-40 split between the pacific and atlantic oceans. hopefully will do that by 2020. increasing army and marine presence in the region, after iraq and afghanistan. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including the deployment of f-22's and the in the 22 ospreys in japan. and laying the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter in 2017. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and in the middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence. i building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe, and using these innovative rotational deployments as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can help provide for their own security. in latin america, in africa, in europe and elsewh
on january 4th. they fear this could be to natural gas production what the "china syndrome" was to the nuclear power industry. it stars matt damon looking to line up leases in pennsylvania farm country and john as a environmental activist to try to stop him. >> i'm here my farm is gone. the land turned brown. it happened to one of us. it could happen to all of us. >> reporter: damon and chris since ski who co-wrote the script together, they're using fracking as jumping off point to explore american identity. >> it really asks more questions than it answers but they're important questions that i think we're all need to be asking right now. >> reporter: but conservative blogs like the heritage foundation say this move -- movie looks nothing on surface to be hit piece on tracking indisstri. analysts say this could be a big problem going forward. charles edwards with the brookings institution. >> someone like matt damon will make convincing actor, undoubtedly casting concerns about shale gas on the horizon. that will probably become a lot of people's perceptions that shale gas
it -- and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue and -- in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 s plit between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)